All posts tagged: school

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Hypertension as an Autoimmune Disease ✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN       High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a common condition that affects 1 in every 3 adults in the United States.  Although hypertension typically has no signs or symptoms, it can lead to serious complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure.  There are many different conditions that can contribute to the development of hypertension, including kidney, adrenal, and thyroid disorders, sleep apnea, and the use of certain medications and illegal substances.  However, for the majority of people with hypertension, there is no identifiable cause, which leads to a diagnosis of essential or primary hypertension. Some recent research suggests that essential hypertension may be caused by an autoimmune response that leads to changes in vascular and kidney function.  Researchers found that oxidative stress and inflammation promoted an exaggerated immune response, which ultimately lead to the development of high blood pressure. This study is fascinating because the role of the immune system in hypertension is never commonly discussed in conventional health care.  Nurses and other health …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Leading Ways to Heal a Leaky Gut: Part 2 ✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN       Leaky gut is the phenomenon by which the lining of the intestine becomes damaged, leading to increased intestinal permeability.  In some cases, leaky gut can be the root cause or contributing factor to systemic inflammation and chronic disease.  In Part 1 of this series, we explored various means of healing a leaky gut, and you can also read more about the causes of leaky gut here.   Other approaches to healing a leaky gut include:   Balance the gut flora: To promote healthy gut flora, include fermented foods in your diet on a regular basis.  At times, it also may be appropriate to include a probiotic supplement, but consult with your health care practitioner first.   Discover and eradicate gastrointestinal infections:Gastrointestinal infections sometimes result from an imbalance of gut bacteria.  They may resolve by following the above recommendations, but occasionally, they need to be specifically addressed.  There are natural, holistic ways of eradicating many of these concerns. However, if treatment requires conventional medicines, you may need to see a …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Leading Ways to Heal a Leaky Gut: Part 1 ✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN       Leaky gut is the phenomenon by which the lining of the intestine becomes damaged, leading to increased intestinal permeability.  The intestinal barrier can become damaged from a variety of factors, including a variety of dietary and lifestyle factors, as well as environmental exposures.  You can read more about the causes of leaky gut here.   If you suspect that you have a leaky gut, there are several ways to address it:   ●  Eat a whole food, nutrient-dense diet that excludes foods that irritate the gut:  It is critical to eliminate all processed foods and eat a real food, nutrient-dense diet that eliminates foods that are known to irritate or damage the lining of the gut.  Foods that irritate the intestinal barrier and can lead to inflammation include grains, legumes, dairy products, processed foods, refined sugars, and alcohol.  With any healing dietary approach to leaky gut syndrome, the popular “80/20” approach to healthy eating is not recommended because your commitment needs to be 100% in order to allow the …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Leaky Gut: What Is It and What Causes It?

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN       Leaky gut is the phenomenon by which the lining of the intestine becomes damaged, leading to increased intestinal permeability. The intestinal lining is one of the immune system’s major lines of defense against infections, toxins, and other threats that are introduced into the body through food and drink. Normally, the intestinal epithelial cells sit together closely and are joined by tight junctions that form a barrier to prevent unwanted substances from passing through into the bloodstream. The intestinal barrier can become damaged from a variety of factors, including:   A poor diet, such as the standard American diet that is high in processed carbohydrates, excess sugar, and hydrogenated oils Food sensitivities Certain gut-irritating foods, such as grains, legumes, dairy, and alcohol Chronic stress Hormonal imbalances Certain medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,antibiotics, steroids, hormonal contraceptives, and chemotherapy drugs Chronic endurance exercise and overtraining Environmental toxins Infections and parasites Imbalance of the gut flora.   When the lining of the intestine is damaged, the junctions between the cells are widened …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Top Ways to Recover After Gluten Exposure: Part 2

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN         If you have celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, accidental exposure to gluten can be quite unpleasant and may result in a variety of symptoms that may range from muscle aches to gastrointestinal upset to exacerbation of existing disease processes. Fortunately, there are some steps that you can take that can help you to recover more quickly from gluten exposure.   Drink ginger and/or peppermint tea: Ginger and peppermint tea are both known to help relieve nausea and can be soothing to the digestive system. Drink a cup if you are having bothersome nausea or other gastrointestinal symptoms.   Take activated charcoal: Activated charcoal is an over-the-counter supplement that may be useful if taken immediately following gluten exposure. Activated charcoal may help by binding with the offending food and preventing it from being absorbed by the body. Similar to digestive enzymes, activated charcoal will not necessarily prevent internal damage caused by gluten. Also, this supplement can bind with medications, so consult with your licensed health care professional prior …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Top Ways to Recover After Gluten Exposure: Part 1

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN         Whether it happened when you dined at a restaurant that didn’t have a dedicated 100% gluten-free kitchen, or when you ate the meatloaf that your aunt insisted didn’t have any bread or flour it in, or even if you have no idea how it happened, many of those with gluten intolerance or celiac disease who follow a real food template have been there: the unfortunate accidental exposure to gluten that is often referred to as “glutening” or “being glutened”. When gluten is eliminated from the diet for a period of time, re-exposure will often lead to unpleasant reactions in people with celiac disease or a gluten intolerance. Symptoms of gluten exposure can vary widely and may include:   Muscle and Body Aches Joint Pain Fatigue Bloating or Gas Nausea or Stomach Cramps Constipation or Diarrhea Rashes, Acne, or Other Skin Disturbances Headaches or Migraines Depression or Anxiety Brain fog Irritability Exacerbation of Existing Disease Processes   The severity of symptoms from gluten exposure and the length of …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Is salt bad for your health?✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN   In its unprocessed state, salt is a naturally occurring mineral compound that consists mostly of sodium chloride and trace amounts of other minerals, such as silicon, phosphorous, and bromine.  Although the conventional medical community has long advised individuals with high blood pressure to consume low-salt diets, there is little evidence to support that reducing salt intake results in a clinically significant decrease in blood pressure or decreases the risk of complications of high blood pressure.  A report in 2013 by the Institute of Medicine concluded that the quality of evidence linking salt to poor health outcomes is lacking. A close examination of several randomized trials actually revealed worse health outcomes in those consuming very low salt diets.  A Cochrane review conducted in 2011 found that there was no clinically significant impact of dietary salt intake reduction on mortality or complications from cardiovascular disease.   However, not all salt is created equal and there are still good reasons to avoid table salt and the salt found in high amounts in refined foods.  …

Rob Hill Presents: A Pineapple a day, keeps the depression at bay. And other foods to liven your mood.✍🏼

By: Rob Hill When it comes to mood and depression disorders, most people think they are brain issues, but that is quickly changing. Recent studies by scientists have found that a large portion—up to 90%—of serotonin is produced in the enterochromaffin cells in your GI tract, not brain. Therefore, since serotonin is a large contributor to feelings of joy, happiness, and mood, one of the keys to feeling good is the food you eat, not the brain pills you take. Serotonin is secreted from the enterochromaffin cells and into the blood. There, it is actively taken up by blood platelets, which store it. When the platelets bind to a clot, they release serotonin. And depending on how much you get, your mood can swing from pure happiness to down and out depression. And food is key. Dubbed part of the “smart” carbohydrate class, Oats have a zen affect on your well being. When ingested, they spark production of tryptophan, an important amino acid that synthesizes with serotonin. Similarly, bananas are good for the blues because …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Do you need to go on a cleanse or detox diet?: Part 1✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN                It’s that time of year when people are setting new goals and resolutions, and for many, that includes a renewed focus on health.  Indeed, January is a popular time to start a new diet, and there is no shortage of cleanses and detox diets from which to choose.  But what is the truth about cleanses and detoxes?  Can they be helpful for those seeking better health or are they simply a scam?   The word “detox” has many different meanings depending on the context in which it’s used ranging from spiritual to scientific in nature.  From a physiological and biochemical perspective, detoxification is defined as a metabolic process by which the body rids itself of toxins. This is a natural process that is necessary for survival—every single minute of every single day that you are alive, your body is performing detoxification.   In general, there are two types of toxins that your body must eliminate or detoxify.  Xenobiotics are foreign substances that introduced into the …

The Paleo Nurse ✚ Presents: Do Shakes and Smoothies Belong in a Nutrient-Dense, Real Food Template? – Part 1 ✍🏼

by Katy Haldiman, MS, RN Shakes and smoothies are growing in popularity within the real food community. Protein shakes are all the rage among Crossfitters and other athletes that are concerned with post-workout nutrition, but also among busy professionals and parents, individuals with either weight loss or weight gain as a goal, pregnant and nursing women, those struggling with autoimmune disease, and the average person searching for optimal health.  One of the most frequent questions that I receive in my work as a nutritional therapist is, “What kind of protein powder do you recommend?”  The appeal of shakes and smoothies lies in their convenience and presumed fit with our modern, hectic lifestyles.  It doesn’t take much time or preparation to throw together a shake or smoothie and drink it.  The convenience factor aside, most of us have been subjected to the influence of heavy marketing efforts that have convinced us that not only do we need more protein in our diet, but the addition of a protein shake can do amazing things for us: gain muscle, lose …